Book Review – “Hear No Evil” by Matthew Paul Turner

**FREE GIVEAWAY – I AM GIVING AWAY 1 FREE COPY OF THIS BOOK.  TO ENTER SUBSCRIBE TO EMAIL UPDATES INTHE BOX ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PAGE.  IF YOU ARE ALREADY SUBSCRIBED, LEAVE A COMMENT THAT YOU WANT TO BE ENTERED.  BONUS ENTRIES: LINK TO THIS ON YOUR BLOG (email me at fgantz12@yahoo.com when you add your link) AND YOU WILL RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL ENTRY.  ENTRIES MUST BE SUBMITTED BY FEBRUARY 28, 2010.  WINNER WILL BE ANNOUNCED ON MARCH 1, 2010.

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Because of my move from Louisville to Chattanooga, this book arrived late in my mail box.  It was worth the wait. Hear No Evil: My Story of Innocence, Music, and the Holy Ghost is Matthew Paul Turner’s story of the role of music in his spiritual journey.  Some journey it is.  It begins in the culture of an Independent Fundamentalist Baptist church and family.  Here hymns are the only acceptable expression of music.  The journey continues through college at the musically-gifted Belmont University in the heart of music-minded Nashville.  The route includes stops at coffeehouses with Christian music and writing about contemporary Christian music.

This record of the journey ends with the reader confident that wherever the journey takes him in the future, music and faith will be a huge part of the journey.  As a man on my own faith journey, music has played an important part in that journey.  If this describes you, then you will enjoy and be challenged by reading this book.  Turner is witty and tells stories in a way that makes you want to keep reading to see what is next.  I caught myself laughing out loud as I turned page after page.  While humorous, the story allowed me to think about my own struggles with the relationships between genuine faith, culture and various Christian sub-cultures.

Turner’s humorous anecdotes relate to various Christian sub-cultures.  This has long been a topic of interest for me.  Often Christians have become so immersed in their own subculture that interaction with culture in general is made difficult or at times farcical.  Turner reveals this by discussing the issues surrounding listening to such “controversial” artists as Sandi Patti and Amy Grant.  He also encounters the subcultures of Young Calvinism, Contemporary Christian Music, Christian schools and recovering Christians.

To get your copy of the book or learn more about it, go to Random House or click on the book image at the beginning of the article.

Disclaimer: This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.


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