norman

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For many Christians Psalm 37 contains one of their favorite Bible verses. Having this verse as a favorite is great unless it becomes a mantra for our own selfishness.

Delight yourself in the LORD, and he will give you the desires of your heart. (Psalm 37:4 ESV)

If we are not careful, we can fall prey to the same thinking as expressed by Janis Joplin when she sang, Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes Benz? Surely we are not that crass. But do we sometimes think deep down that if I just delight in the Lord enough, that Mercedes could be mine? Maybe luxury cars aren’t your thing. Perhaps you would complete the line of the song with something else. Is that really what the psalmist is speaking about in this passage?

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worship meme

Top 25 College QB’s for 2014

My favorite position in sports is the quarterback position. I was one. Sporting News has released it’s projection of the top 25 QB’s for the upcoming 2014 season.

I can’t see much room for arguing with the top picks. I do see argument room on down the list. #13 Devin Gardner (Michigan) is highly overrated on this list while #22 Anthony Boone (Duke) seems the most underrated.

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Recently it became an easy thing to find out the first tweet of twitter accounts. I have gathered some of those and found some interesting tidbits. These are arranged by the following categories: Eager Declarations, Leery Beginnings, Straight to Business, Paul Tripp Quotes and the Mundane.

Yes, an entire category of Paul Tripp quotes. One is a retweet of Tripp by Keith Baker (@pastorkeith73) which simply shows up as from Tripp. Sadly my first tweet falls in the mundane category (with the good company of Mike Cosper). Cosper gets the award for jumping right in with a food tweet. Mine, however, was about horse racing (:.

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meme-lloyd-jones-pray

Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther. Roland Bainton. 1950.

luther

When it comes time for me to select a book to read, I am usually happier when I have selected an older book. It’s not that new books are not worthwhile, but books that have stood the test of time have been more edifying for me.

So when I pulled my copy of Roland Bainton’s biography of Martin Luther off of my shelf, I knew I was in for a special treat. The book did not disappoint. Bainton managed to put together what has stood as the standard for biographies about the German Reformer. He managed to pull together the various strains of Luther and his times in a readable format. The issues of the day are thoroughly presented. In the end the reader should come away with a clear picture of the man who was used by God to shape both church and culture long after his death.

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